Posts tagged constitutional law
Restricted Knowledge on Jury Nullification and its Repercussions

Jury nullification is evidently a power exercised by jurors. The question remains how jurors can become informed of this right without facing legal punishments for attempting to influence a jury. Today, because of unclear and incomprehensive rulings on jury nullification, citizens have been arrested and charged with jury tampering when informing jurists of their de facto right to question a law.

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A Direct Tax on Womanhood: Analyzing the Discriminatory Nature of the Tampon Tax

Menstrual equity, a term coined in the mid-twentieth century by feminist activists, has gained traction in mainstream media with the rise of intersectional dialogue and women’s empowerment. Contemporary feminists have taken this initiative a step further, and have recently begun the zealous advocacy for menstrual equity in the wake of the infamous ‘tampon tax’ - a tax levied on feminine hygiene products due to the fact that they do not meet the “basic necessity” tax exemption.

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The Constitutionality of Hate Speech: Why it is a Necessary Evil on College Campuses

On February 1, 2017, over 1,500 UC Berkeley students gathered at Sproul Plaza to protest the speech of the notorious conservative Milo Yiannopoulos. [1] Known for his anti-Semitic sentiments, anti-feminist critiques, and alt-right stances, his invitation to speak at Berkeley was a momentous decision to uphold a free marketplace of ideas: a First Amendment philosophy that an unregulated circulation of ideas, instead of speech censorship, will contribute to the prevailing of truth.

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Should Facebook be Accessible to Sex Offenders? A First Amendment Analysis

The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states that “Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech.”[1] The Supreme Court has typically interpreted the term “speech” to incorporate a broad range of expressions, including the use of Internet.[2] However, the increasing use of the Internet and social media sites has led to debate as to what constitutes free speech in the digital age and if digital platforms should be made accessible to the entire public. Currently, Facebook’s accessibility to the public has been contested in relation to the right of sex offenders to use the site, as limiting their access conflicts with freedom of speech protected under the First Amendment. 

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Korematsu and the Muslim Ban: The Legal Consequences of Unchecked Executive Power

 In 1942, Fred Korematsu was arrested on a street corner in California. His crime was refusing to evacuate to an internment camp and comply with President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066. Under the executive order, over 120,000 men, women, and children of Japanese descent were forced to relocate from their homes on the coasts to remote camps inland; they had been deemed a “national security threat” after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. [1] Korematsu was the first man to legally challenge the order in Korematsu v. United States.

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